How to wear autumn's bourgeois trend

To relieve us of the whiplash that flurries of new seasonal trends can induce, certain designers took a collective pause and decided to get more grounded in their approaches to fashion this autumn. The result? The emergence of the bourgeois trend - think timeless blazers and skirts, heritage fabrics, earthy hues, ‘70s influences and modest but polished cuts. In a real move away from street style and high-octane dressing, there’s not a trainer, neon hue or complicated cut in sight – just the dependable, easy-to-wear styles that autumn was made for. To help you stay on the right side of antique Town&Country model, we’ve searched out the easiest ways to emulate the chicest trend of autumn/winter.

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LOOK 1


Long skirt suits may remind you of vintage, smoky boardrooms at first glance, but it’s surprisingly easy to shake off the prim factor that comes with a longer hem and crisp tailoring. Teaming with long and luxe-looking ankle boots, a turtleneck and a silk scarf tied at the neck makes for a interestingly retro outfit. After dark, slip out of the knitwear and opt for a dressy top, add some embellished kitten heels and a shoulder bag for an elegant and strictly out-of-office evening look.


ALPINE SKIES


If Blair Waldorf levels of ladylike elegance feels like too much of a stretch, keep your look nonchalant and err on the side of casual by mingling heritage fabrics with modern ones. A tweed or check blazer is the epitome of bourgeois elegance, layer over a high-neck blouse or fine jumper, throw in your favourite dark indigo jeans to ground your look and add expensive-looking mock-croc accessories and a few embellished hair accessories.  


LOOK 3


There's always something swish about a slinky black mini dress. This style already harks back to the ‘70s with flouncy neck-tie detailing but to give it even more of a retro spin for a night on the town, throw on a pair of tube-shaped boots, a mock-croc bag and, if you’re feeling really brave, a faux-fur coat. This look proves the so-called "boring" bourgeoisie trend can still be striking and seductive.